Young County IT Director Eric Steadham receives a text alerting him that components have broken off the network at the county courthouse.
Young County IT Director Eric Steadham receives a text alerting him that components have broken off the network at the county courthouse. (Casey Holder)
From a few yards away, the incomplete 2015 Young County budget could easily resemble the first unbound draft of the next great American novel. It’s thick, and filled with line items for each county office and need.

It covers everything, from mental health to the humane society to libraries to transportation to copier supplies. County officials must carefully consider each line item, and the Young County Commissioners Court made some headway at its first budget workshop Monday morning, June 16. Court members can’t breeze through budget items, but they also can’t linger on each. There is a deadline.

Young County set its final budget deadline for August 25, 35 days before the Sept. 30 state mandated deadline. That’s a little over two months, meaning expedience is important to the process. But this past Monday, one topic got the court talking for about 20 minutes, and it involves the future of digital data storage for all Young County offices.

“Cloud based storage and cloud based computing is essentially allowing off-site storage for data,” said Young County IT Director Eric Steadham. “The way that this specific type of program is set up, it allows for us to remove our in-house, very costly equipment to an off-site location in east Texas to reduce the cost of overhead, as well as safe-gaurd us in the event of a catastrophe.”

Steadham said that while not an immediate nor all encompassing fix, adopting a cloud storage system would not only help with the management of the county’s digital data storage, but its physical document and file storage as well.

Young County’s current data storage system operates through an IBM AS/400, a server in the Young County Law Enforcement Center whose software is run through NET Data out of Sulfur Springs.

“The problem that we always incur with technology is that at some point in time it becomes outdated or it becomes obsolete,” Steadham said.

Read the entire story in this weekend's Graham Leader.