Area firefighters are on the scene battling a fire at Possum Kingdom Lake. The fire started at about 4:30 p.m. Monday on the peninsula at PK Lake.
Area firefighters are on the scene battling a fire at Possum Kingdom Lake. The fire started at about 4:30 p.m. Monday on the peninsula at PK Lake. (Mark Engebretson)
Tuesday officials reported about 40 acres have burned in a fire on the peninsula at Possum Kingdom Lake, and 13 departments from the area, including those from Young County Rural Volunteer Fire Stations, are assisting. It is about 70 percent contained.

The fire, reported just after 4:30 p.m. Monday, was along Frontier Unit Road. Initially reported as a grass fire, responding units from Possum Kingdom East Volunteer Fire Department found flames on both the east and west side of the road well past Bug Beach.

Firefighters were able to contain the flames on the east side of Frontier Unit Road, but flames had spread well into cedars on the west side. Dense brush made access difficult.
A fire burned portions of the peninsula at Possum Kingdom Lake, beginning at about 4:30 p.m. Monday. No structures have been lost.
A fire burned portions of the peninsula at Possum Kingdom Lake, beginning at about 4:30 p.m. Monday. No structures have been lost. (Cheryl Adams)
Wind pushed the flames over a rise and toward the Upper Burma Road, and firefighters fought to save several structures that were threatened. No structures have been lost.

Young County Chief Steve Reger said he was out with the fire until 3:40 a.m. Tuesday and said the fire is everything he's come to expect from a PK fire.

“It's one of those extremely hard to get to fires,” said Reger. “It's up on a mountain overlooking some homes. It's what I call the typical PK fire because it's extremely rough country with all the cedars and the cedar moisture is low enough that they're burning and once they get started it's just like gasoline.”
Before leaving the area early Tuesday he said the fire was mostly contained.

“We had it down pretty good. There was still lots of hot spots, but we had the head fire stopped and we were working with the edges and finding hot spots where it had jumped the road,” said Reger. “It burned to a road, and we stopped it at the road. But it came through so fast, it was throwing embers onto houses next to the lake and burning yards next to houses. And that's what our main objection was to save these homes, and luckily we didn't lose any homes last night.”